F.A.Q.

Answers to our most commonly asked questions.

I totally don’t understand how to connect this thing. A Target? What’s that? Help! I want to kill all Lemurs!

Can you provide complete routing information for connecting all 3 products?

If I have multiple MK products, does each one gets its own Target?

On the product page for MK Connect it says “All your products can share the same connection to MK Connect”. If each product gets its own MIDI connection, then how is this possible?

Why does MK Connect provide connections for multiple tablets?

I’ve tried and tried and read all your documents. I made the connections as you suggest but it’s still not working. What do I do?

Why doesn’t my tablet appear in the list of available devices in the Lemur Editor’s Connections window.

What is the difference between a WiFi connection and a hardware connection?

I’m suffering from WiFi droputs. Any advice?

Can you help me set up the iConnectMIDI?

If I’m using the iConnect do I have to also use the Lemur Daemon/LoopBE30?

Do I have to install MK Connect on my tablet as well?

My MK Product says “Disconnected” in the logo, what is going on?

Do I have to be connected to MK Connect all the time?

I’ve spent a lot of time creating my customized presets. How do I back up my work to my computer?

Why do some files have the extension “.jzml” and some “.jzlib”? What’s the difference?

How do I move C_brains into the same project as Composer Tools Pro (or vice-versa)?

How do I resize the controller?

In C_brains/Composer Tools Pro I see that I can send my Utility Buttons on ANY Lemur Target. Should I send Composer Tools’ Utility Buttons to Composer Tools’ Target, and C_brains’ Utility Buttons to C_brains’ Target?

Is it a bad idea to send Utility Buttons on the same Target as C_brains? Will I accidentally trigger a C_brains macro?

I totally don’t understand how to connect this thing. A Target? What’s that? Help! I want to kill all Lemurs!

Frustration with studio routing is totally understandable. Hooking up invisible cables to hundreds of MIDI tracks, server computers, iPads, MIDI keyboards, EWIs, MIDI Guitars—it can be confusing.

We always advise people to take a step back and not to overthink this step. All you are doing is hooking up MIDI cables, it’s just that the cables happen to be virtual ones.

The first thing you need to do is understand Lemur’s Target system.

Lemur routes MIDI on something called “Targets”. A Target is nothing more than a group. You can think of it EXACTLY like an audio mix bus—but for MIDI!

Think of it like this, say you are recording your rock band and you have multiple guitar tracks: Acoustic Rhythm Guitar, Electric Rhythm Guitar, and Lead Guitar. When you are mixing it’s common to send them all to a single mix bus called “Guitars” so that you can control them all with a single fader and have a single audio output.

This is EXACTLY what a Target is doing: providing a group so that multiple functions can share the same MIDI connection.

Each Target is its own independent MIDI stream, just like your “Guitars” mix is its own audio stream. Once you’ve decided which Target to use, you hook it up to a single MIDI connection and all those functions can share the connection.

For more information on Lemur Targets, see this article: https://www.midikinetics.com/understanding-targets/

Can you provide complete routing information for connecting all 3 products?

Sample Setup for 1 iPad using iConnectMIDI4+

Sample Setup for 1 iPad using Lemur Daemon

Sample Setup for 1 iPad using LoopBE30

As you can see there are numerous ways you can connect Lemur. Lemur is very smart and will show you all the various MIDI connections available in your studio. You can even mix-and-match connection types.

People get very intimidated by hooking up Lemur. Take a step back and consider that all you are doing here is connecting MIDI cables.

Lemur provides 8 independent, bidirectional streams of MIDI called “Targets”. You simply assign your controls to one of the Targets and then hook up a virtual MIDI connection.

If I have multiple MK products, does each one gets its own Target?

Correct. You wouldn’t want MIDI meant for Composer Tools to be sent to a destination meant for C_brains, just like you wouldn’t want one of your vocal tracks to be sent to your guitar mix.

On the product page for MK Connect it says “All your products can share the same connection to MK Connect”. If each product gets its own MIDI connection, then how is this possible?

Each product uses 2 Targets: the main Target, and the Target for MK Connect.

MK Connect knows how to differentiate between the different products. It doesn’t matter if the MIDI data gets mixed because MK Connect knows how to work it out.

We wouldn’t want you to waste 3 Lemur Targets just to provide licensing information for 3 products! MK Connect will work out which products are authorized and send the license info back to the appropriate product.

Why does MK Connect provide connections for multiple tablets?

If you are using multiple tablets you must hook up different MIDI connections. This is a limitation of MIDI itself.

Take a step back and consider that all you are doing is hooking up MIDI cables—they just happen to be virtual ones. You couldn’t plug a single physical MIDI cable into two connections. The same is true with virtual MIDI cables.

When you connect a MIDI connection between MK Connect and a tablet, they own that MIDI connection. If you need to connect another tablet you will need to use another MIDI connection.

Have you ever been working in one music application (i.e. music notation program) then opened your DAW only to find that your MIDI keyboard isn’t working? That’s because your notation program owns that MIDI connection to your keyboard. Only once the notation program releases the connection to your MIDI keyboard will it start working again in your DAW.

I’ve tried and tried and read all your documents. I made the connections as you suggest but it’s still not working. What do I do?

Please email us all relevant screenshots and we will gladly help you out. We cannot properly help you unless you send us a complete picture of the signal flow.

  • Prefs/Connections Tab for all your products showing the Targeting.
  • Lemur’s “More Settings” page showing the MIDI connections for each target. If you use multiple tablets be sure to send screenshots from all of them.
  • MK Connect Connections tab.
  • All relevant Preference pages from your DAW showing the MIDI connections to Lemur. For example, for C_brains send the MIDI Device Setup page and the Generic Remotes. For MK Transport on Logic send the Control Surface window.

Why doesn’t my tablet appear in the list of available devices in the Lemur Editor’s Connections window.

Check to make sure that your tablet is on the same network as your computer and is discoverable. Once it is, it will automatically appear in this list.

What is the difference between a WiFi connection and a hardware connection?

WiFi is cheap and/or free and provides tremendous convenience, while hardware (like the iConnectMIDI) provides much more stability. If you are a DJ and rely on a solid connection for a live show you wouldn’t want a sudden WiFi dropout to stop the party. For most people the two are not much different.

I’m suffering from WiFi droputs. Any advice?

If you suffer from WiFi dropouts unfortunately there’s not much advice MIDI Kinetics can offer. Networking is a complicated subject with many factors involved and we certainly aren’t experts. Some people swear by fixed IP addresses. Some people tear their hair out until they give up and move to a cabin in the woods.

In our studio, we use a basic WiFi connection 99% of the time. Our WiFi router is downstairs next to the TV, but our computers are in a spare room upstairs, and the studio is next to it. Getting a WiFi signal from the tablets in the studio upstairs, downstairs to the router, then back upstairs to the computer room just wasn’t working. We didn’t want to run Ethernet cables through the walls and we didn’t want to bother with setting up another local WiFi network.

The solution for us was a Powerline Adapter. They are very cheap and work like magic. The Powerline allowed us to plug an Ethernet cable directly from the router to the computers without running cables through the walls. This bypassed the air gap between the router downstairs and the computers upstairs. Our network is now basically 99% stable and we have near zero downtime.

We don’t have great electrical in the building and occasionally the Powerline Adapter makes a little clicking sound in the wall socket. We hope it won’t catch fire.

Can you help me set up the iConnectMIDI?

This is a tough box to set up. Unfortunately, we only have experience with the iConnectMIDI4+. Since this is not our product we don’t offer direct support for it.

These settings work for us and we have used them flawlessly in multiple studios. They are for the most typical composer’s use case:

  • 1 or 2 iPads connected using iConnectivity’s proprietary Thunderbolt/USB cable to the 2 front jacks (bidirectional).
  • A USB MIDI keyboard connected to the rear USB jack (unidirectional).
  • The iConnect connected via USB to the computer.

If I’m using the iConnect do I have to also use the Lemur Daemon/LoopBE30?

No. There’s no harm in installing it though. It’s always good to have WiFi MIDI ports available.

Keep in mind though that even if you don’t use WiFi MIDI ports, you will still at some point need a WiFi connection to transfer projects from the Editor to the app. You can also transfer Lemur projects via iTunes, but we ourselves have never had to do this.

Do I have to install MK Connect on my tablet as well?

No, MK Connect is a macOS/Windows app only. There is no iOS/Android app.
MK Connect tethers Lemur to your licensed computer.

My MK Product says “Disconnected” in the logo, what is going on?

This means you aren’t connected to MK Connect, and license information isn’t being transferred. There are 3 possible reasons for this:

  1. You set the correct Target for MK Connect but connected it to the wrong MIDI port.
  2. You set the correct MIDI port but connected it to the wrong Target.
  3. You set the Target and MIDI port correctly, but your MIDI device isn’t configured correctly. If you use WiFi, perhaps WiFi isn’t working. If you use a hardware box, then the hardware isn’t configured correctly and no MIDI is flowing through the box.

Go through some basic troubleshooting steps isolating each component one at a time.

First, check to make sure that you have set MK Connect to the desired Lemur Target, and that the Lemur Target is connected to the desired MIDI port.

Next, rule out any issues with your physical/virtual MIDI connections. If you are using a hardware box like the iConnectMIDI make sure that the box is working.

Do I have to be connected to MK Connect all the time?

Yes, but remember: MK Connect transmits license information via MIDI. If you for some reason you lose MIDI connection to MK Connect, you’ve also probably lost all your other MIDI connections. Maybe a cable became unplugged, or the WiFi signal dropped. MK Connect is designed to be as transparent as possible. Just set it to an available MIDI port and forget about it.

I’ve spent a lot of time creating my customized presets. How do I back up my work to my computer?

The Lemur Editor is capable of bidirectional WiFi communication with the Lemur app on your tablet.

  • When you press “Connect” you send what’s in the Editor to the app.
  • When you press “Download” you send what’s in the app to the Editor.

So, to back up your work to your computer, just download!

Word of caution: whatever’s currently in the Editor will be overwritten. Save first!

Here’s a step-by-step:

  1. Open the Lemur Editor on your mac/PC.
  2. Click the Connections triangle in the top right of the Editor. The Editor shows you a list of all the available tablets in your studio currently running the Lemur app. If you don’t see it, either you aren’t running the Lemur app, or the Editor can’t find your tablet on the network.
  3. Select the tablet you want, and press “Download”.
  4. Save the Editor project to your hard drive.

Why do some files have the extension “.jzml” and some “.jzlib”? What’s the difference?

The Lemur Editor uses two different file types:

  1. jzml files are standalone Lemur project files. You can double-click them and they will open a new project in the Editor.
  2. jzlib files are little Lemur modules that can be exported and imported into existing Lemur project files.

To be clear: “standalone” does NOT mean you can’t run multiple MK products in a single Lemur project. You absolutely can. You can copy/paste the contents of one jzml file into another.

Composer Tools Pro and C_brains ship as jzml files. When you double click the file, they will open a new project in the Lemur Editor. Indeed, we could have just as easily shipped them as jzlib files, but most people seem to like to double click things.

MK Transport, on the other hand, ships as a jzlib file. It works like a little Lemur plugin that you drop into other projects. For this product, a jzlib was a more natural choice.

When you export banks from Composer Tools Pro you export jzlib files. For more information on exporting and importing presets, see the Composer Tools Pro Knowledgebase.

When you transfer your settings to a new version you export them as jzlib files.

How do I move C_brains into the same project as Composer Tools Pro (or vice-versa)?

Simple. Just select the outermost container for C_brains, and…copy/paste! One of Lemur’s super-powers is how modular it is. You can copy/paste elements in between projects.

  1. Open C_brains in the Editor.
  2. Select the outermost “C_brains” container.
  3. Press copy (CMD/CTL + C) to copy it to your clipboard.
  4. Open Composer Tools Pro.
  5. Press paste (CMD/CTL + V).

How do I resize the controller?

Just do it! Go ahead. It won’t bite.

Drag the outer container and the project will resize the contents.

In C_brains/Composer Tools Pro I see that I can send my Utility Buttons on ANY Lemur Target. Should I send Composer Tools’ Utility Buttons to Composer Tools’ Target, and C_brains’ Utility Buttons to C_brains’ Target?

That depends! What are you using them for? Utility Buttons just send MIDI data…what do you want to do with that data? Where should it end up?

Consider for a moment what each controller does:

  • Composer Tools Pro is primarily a virtual instrument controller. You use it for all your performance data: keyswitches, CCs, pitch-bend, etc. You record it onto your tracks because it’s part of the musical performance itself!
  • C_brains is primarily a DAW control surface. It triggers productivity key command and macros in the background which help you control the DAW software. You never want this MIDI data to get recorded onto your tracks!

Most people use Utility Buttons for additional key commands and macros. Perhaps there is a key command you love and it isn’t included with C_brains’ basic set. You can easily set one up using a Utility Button.

When using a Utility Button for key commands and macros, you wouldn’t want to send them on the same Target as Composer Tools Pro. Again, Composer Tools Pro is primarily a virtual instrument controller; its output is part of the musical performance itself. Key commands, on the other hand, are not at all part of the musical performance and should never be recorded onto a MIDI track. In this case, pick a new Target for your custom stuff.

You don’t have to use Utility Buttons for key commands and macros. It’s perfectly reasonable to use Utility Buttons for performance controls too! Perhaps you want to have a button that acts like a MIDI “reset”; maybe it sends CC11 (Expression) at some default value to “reset” a virtual instrument. In that case, it becomes part of the musical performance itself and you should send it on the same Target as Composer Tools Pro.

P.S. Composer Tools Pro has a very sophisticated controller reset mechanism built-in called the “Send Defaults Button”. Check the manual for info.

Is it a bad idea to send Utility Buttons on the same Target as C_brains? Will I accidentally trigger a C_brains macro?

Yes, you might. C_brains tries to prevent you from doing this. Generally, it is not a good idea.

If you open the Generic Remotes for C_brains you will see all the MIDI assignments for every macro. You could pick a MIDI message that isn’t used. This isn’t advised, however, because in the future MIDI Kinetics may add new commands. To be safe, pick another Target for your custom commands.